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NSK looks ahead with apprentices

2021-04-19

NSK’S apprentices, left to right, Beth Hendry, Regan Otter, Max White, and Edvin Pateckis, with the head of business development in health and engineering, Ian Hurst, left, and principal engineer Tim Colin.

Two new apprentices have been taken on by NSK Ltd in Newark as they look to mould their engineers for the future.
It is the second year the company has taken on two apprentice engineers.
It received 35 applications, from which a shortlist of ten was drawn up.
After an apprentice day, including interviews and activities, positions were offered to teenagers Beth Hendry and Edvin Pateckis, both from the Newark area.
The three-year engineering apprenticeship officially started this week.
The apprentices will spend four days a week at Lincoln College and one day at NSK’s Newark plant on Northern Road for the first year.
The second year will involve one day at college and the remaining four at NSK.
They will work entirely from NSK for the third year.
Mr Ian Hurst, head of business development in safety and engineering at NSK, said: “We support them all the way through their apprenticeship and beyond.
“They can’t make a difference today or tomorrow, but we have a five and ten-year vision.
“They are our future engineers and can help develop the plant and continue to be successful.
“It is getting more and more difficult to attract good talented engineers. With the apprentices we can find the right people and develop them ourselves for the future.”
Beth said she was drawn to the apprenticeship rather than going to university.
“The opportunity to train as an engineer is difficult to come across and this has the added bonus of earning while we are learning,” she said.
“It is fantastic that we can start off learning on the job with ease rather than being thrown in at the deep end.
Edvin felt it was good to have the opportunity of four days at college before putting what they had learned into practice.
“It is better than just getting a job and being thrown into the work without much knowledge,” he said,
Mr Hurst said the apprenticeships help to provide knowledge with which to move forward.
A second-year apprentice, Max White, said: “I’m looking forward to putting what we have learnt into practice.
“I feel like with the apprenticeship we gain a more specific skillset by being hands-on.”
NSK has a global market presence, employing more than 31,000 employees in 30 countries.
In addition to a complete rolling bearing portfolio, NSK Ltd develops and manufactures precision components and mechatronic products, as well as systems and components for the automotive industry, including wheel bearing units and electric power-steering systems.
There are around 370 engineers at the Newark site, who produce several sizes of the NSK high-precision angular-contact ball bearings that are needed throughout Europe.

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